Julie And The Shoe Factory

Palm Springs IFF

Julie And The Shoe Factory

A Film by Kostia Testut & Paul Calori

2016 - France - Musical Comedy - 2.35 - 90 min.

with Francois Morel , Pauline ETIENNE & Olivier CHANTREAU

Language: French
Produced by Xavier Delmas

When Julie finally lands a job at a luxury shoemaker, her dreams of stability collapse as the owner threatens to close the factory.
Together with an intrepid group of women, they decide to resist, bringing back to life a bold and elegant shoe model to save the renowned brand. But when Samy, a young truck driver as wily as charming, jumps in the middle of the fight, this is no longer the same song...

In Collection:
Palm Springs IFF

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